Wednesday, March 25, 2015


 


I have two beautiful children – a  3 year old and an 18 month old.

My day is chaos. Please help.

This is a busy season for you. Each day will be long and full.

There will be messes and tears.

This is very normal.

To make things a little bit more manageable for you and calmer for you and your precious wee ones, try to have a bit of a pattern for your day.

Balance the day between independent play times ( so they learn self-play adeptness skills and you get a chance to tacckle some household tasks),
some focus play time (where you enjoy this special stage and their little love tank is filled to overflowing),
some sibling play time (at a time when you can supervise and promote their friendship)
and some side-by-side play times (where you work on household tasks while they enjoy their play).

Let the pattern be a help to you, not a stress.
On a lovely sunny day your outside play may take up most of the morning.
On a grumpy, grizzly day, the TV time may be extended.

Have an idea of what the day will look like yet be prepared for change too!

Monday, February 23, 2015

Tiredness Tantrums


 


 

Tiredness tantrums

Pre-tantrum

1. Model self-control and patience yourself

2. Look at your weekly pattern. Do you have a mix of home days and out days in the week? Check your daily pattern. Do you have a mix of busy activities and quiet activities each day?

3. Ensure you have a ritual that you follow before nap and night time sleep that is predictable and calming to help prepare them for long, continuous sleep patterns.

Mid-tantrum

1. Do not give them an audience

2. Do not try and dialogue with them

3. Pop them into bed for a nap

Post-tantrum

1. Cuddle them and tell them that you love them

2. Re-evaluate your patterns. Do you need to be home more? Do you need to mplement some quiet play periods into each day? Do you need to move nap or bedtime sleep times?

3 Gently and patiently teach self-control so that they can choose right even when they are tired.

 

Frustration Tantrums



 

Frustration Tantrums

These are caused by the limitations of their development. Examples include trying to fit a bike between a tree and a fence, waiting for a turn in a board game, having a doll sit up for the tea party or stacking blocks in a high tower.

 

Pre-tantrum

1. Model self-control and patience yourself

2. Sit and play with your child and demonstrate how to do the challenging task

3. Teach the child to raise his hand to ask for help rather than fusss

Mid-tantrum

1. Do not give them an audience

2. Do not try and dialogue with them

3. Remove the object of frustration and isolate the child until they are calm

Post-tantrum

1. Administer a meaningful age appropriate consequence

2. Role-play expected behaviour for next time. Practice riding the bike and then asking for help when the bike gets stuck. Play tea parties with the dolls and model asking for assistance to sit the dolls up.

3. Gently and patiently teach obedience and self-control so they can choose right even when they are frustrated.

 

HOPE

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Hope


Each morning that greets me is full of hope.


Not because I am successful at what I am doing,


Or because the people near me appreciate me,


Or because circumstances are easy,


But because


God


is,


And He is my Father.


To look at the morning any other way


is to believe a lie.


To live in hope is to live in truth;


To live in truth is to bring Him glory;


To bring God glory in my daily living


is the highest from of worship.


Timothy Lane and Paul David Tripp

Monday, December 29, 2014

Death and The Life Well Lived

This article is from a most excellent blog:

LEARNING IN THE GRIP OF GRACE.


Steve Jobs, Death and The Life Well Lived


I recently watched a Steve Jobs speech that he gave at Stanford university (check it out here.) In it he quite candidly talks about death. Here is a quote from it:
“Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life.
Almost everything–all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure–these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important.
Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”
Jobs is saying that the path to the life well lived is remembering you are mortal which is exactly what the Bible says in Psalm 90:2 where the psalmist says “Teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom.”
It got me thinking, if I had only one week or month to live what would I do?
Here are ten things that I would do if I only had a week or a month to live:
  1. Kiss, hug, play and pray with my kids and tell them about Jesus.
  2. Kiss, hug, serve and pray with my wife.
  3. Have the hard but good conversations I have been avoiding
  4. Pray for my family, church and those I loved
  5. Praise God for the gospel
  6. Put time into the leaders and future leaders of Resolved
  7. Preach the gospel with all my heart and strength and without fear
  8. Be fully intellectually, emotionally, physically and spiritually engaged in everything I did
  9. I would ignore Facebook, Twitter and my phone
  10. I would tell people how God has used them to encourage me in my faith
But then that got me thinking what if I did those things all day every day? What if I lived life like that? That would be a life lived for the glory of God. That would be an unwasted life.
So maybe the key to living life to the full is not trying escape death but embrace the fact that you and I are going to die and living in the light of that!
If you had only one month to live what ten things would you do? What if you lived out this list every day? What would your life be like then?
You may also like:

Will There Be Work in Heaven?

How To No Longer Fear Death

The Distinguishing Mark of a Leader

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Sunday, November 23, 2014

Temper Tantrums



Not fun.

For the parent or for the child.

Some suggestions -

Pre-tantrum;

1. Model self-control and patience yourself

2. Have a predictable pattern for most days

3. Make most of the decisions for the child

Mid-tantrum;

1. Do not give them an audience

2. Do not try and dialogue with them

3. Never give them what they are fussing for

Post-tantrum;

1. Administer a meaningful age-appropriate consequence

2. Role-play expected behaviour for next time

3. Gently and patiently teach obedience and self-control.




Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Passion

What is your passion in life?


What do you look forward to?


What do you get excited about?


What do you talk most about?






How do you know what really matters to someone?


Easy.


Look at how they choose to spend two commodities.


Time.


Money.


What does the way you spend your discretionary time and money say about your passion?